Slacking and high repping on squats...?

Discussion in 'Training' started by jaleena, Feb 9, 2010.

  1. jaleena

    jaleena Banned

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    If someone who's spent several years pushing heavy weight decides to spend a month or three just getting volume with what had previously been considered a 3rd warmup set weight...aside from losing some neural adaptation to moving heavy weight, is there anything physiologically negative about not touching a heavy weight for so long?
     
  2. smuggie

    smuggie Maureen aka Mo

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    Is he going to be dieting during that three-month period?
     
  3. Erik

    Erik Admin

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    Can you expand on what is meant by 'getting volume'? What percentage of previous working weight is it?
     
  4. jaleena

    jaleena Banned

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    Mo, yep, dieting. Not getting lean, but dieting nonetheless.
    Minor muscle loss is acceptable, but something like a major shift in muscle fibre type from fast to slow (which I've heard used as a reason to not focus on higher rep training, or longer cardio--though I was an endurance cyclist before I was a PL, and that went okay :unsure: ), causing real problems with going back to heavy training at some later time would not be.
    Other than that, I really don't know what the possibilities are of anything negative happening. I expect that after some time away, I'll have to recondition my CNS to heavier weights, but I don't expect that my CNS will adapt down to considering whatever it is I'm working with to feel "heavy"--that'd also be a bad thing, in my book.

    Erik, something like 5x10, with about 70% of what had been a set of 3.
    The issue being mental laziness. There's been a months-long fight with the heavier weights, and the working weight has been in decline, and it's gotten to be a chore to talk myself into even unracking something that's not clearly in the "warmup weight" category. The sets of 10 feel like cardio and so there's some challenge to getting in the last couple reps on the last set, but just doing it is no battle. Plus, there's no sense of defeat after a workout, as had become routine with the heavier squats.
    I've only done this for two workouts now, but it seems enticing to play with for a bit, likely slowly nudging up the weight as my conditioning improves. Provided, of course, this won't leave me even more screwed up somehow. But so far, I'm enjoying the workouts for the first time in a while.

    If it matters any, it's just squats where this is really an issue. I've had weeks where I've out-benched my squat, considering I finally broke through the 200lbs barrier on my bench. So it's not a total CNS screw-up right now.

    I'm familiar with the benefits of heavy lifting in terms of muscle preservation while dieting, but I've never seen it approached from this angle of just being burnt out--I've always seen a conscious shift down in weight and up in volume happening from people who expected they could "burn out the fat directly" or somesuch. In which case, there's the easy answer of "no, you're wrong" :lol:
    Thanks :)
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2010
  5. smuggie

    smuggie Maureen aka Mo

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    Oh, you were asking for yourself. Why did I assume you were talking about someone else, and a man on top of that. :scratch:
     
  6. jaleena

    jaleena Banned

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    Because who would guess that I'd come up with the idea of not really caring to go over 135/145 (depending on how I care to load the bar that day), and not really caring for how long? It's akin to a sign of the apocalypse. But Saturday, when I took the empty bar for my first set and realized I kinda liked that feeling, well...
    It also can't help that in addition to falling from being a consistent mid-2's squatter to a high 1's squatter/occasional low 2's, some part of me remembers low 4's and doesn't appreciate that anything at all feels heavy :oops:

    I was trying to be general so it'd be as useful as possible--ie listing out whatever can/can't happen in this scenario. Vs getting whatever might be more specific to me...not that I won't appreciate such things, but it's not just every whiney lifter that needs to be told they're not on top of the world anymore and get over it (I don't think anyone ever gets used to being "weak"), in addition to the basic physical pros/cons to evaluate.
     
    Last edited: Feb 11, 2010

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